Crafting the Killer Sales Email

When you sell, inevitably you will not be able to sell in person.  The higher the ticket item, and the more risk there is for adoption, the more the salesperson needs to be face to face with the customer.  If you are selling an app from the App Store, it’s different.

Both sales processes will use email.

One of the great things about email is it’s immediacy.  There is an ability to track it to see if it’s been opened.  The receiver can respond and things can move quickly.  I am old enough to remember having to use a rolodex full of cards and pay phones to communicate with customers.  It’s different today and a lot better.

One of the really bad things about email is its ease of use.  Because it’s so easy, it leads to sloppy email.  I have been guilty of doing this.  A friend of mine that works for a big accounting firm laments the language, the spelling, the sentence construction and the punctuation used when people send emails internally at his firm.  The way you write, the tone, the punctuation and words you use all reflect back on you.  Remember, it’s impossible to read emotion, satire, or anything else in email. Nick Epley wrote a book on it that shows the reasoning behind it.

Since I took Craig Wortmann’s Coursera course, I stopped sending sloppy email.  If you do any selling, or anticipate doing any selling, take Craig’s course.

One big tip on email is to do your research.  You don’t want to waste people’s time.  Everyone gets enough junk email.  For example, if you are an entrepreneur that wants their B2C photo company funded, sending me an email guarantees it gets put in the trash.  You obviously didn’t do your research on me.  We only invest in early stage B2B Fin Tech companies revolutionizing the backbone of finance.  Make sure you do some preliminary research on the person you are sending the email to so that you can personalize it.  If you do that, you are more likely to get a response.

Here are some tips to write killer sales emails:

  • Be crisp and concise.  Keep it short, but get your point across.
  • Cyber invites undisciplined sloppy emails that will elicit a sloppy response.  Be Disciplined.
  • Don’t abuse cyber.  They are a customer, potential customer, not a family member.
  • Use constraints. You are not writing a novel.
  • Have a catchy subject line so people will scan their email and want to open it.  Be bold
  • Make it personal.  Use their name.
  • Short sentences.  No big blocks of text.  People will not read it and will delete it.
  • Give your email energy.  Use words that give it energy and action
  • Action items should be put in bold font.
  • Always have your contact information at the end with the way you want them to get in touch with you (Name, email address, address, phone number, Twitter/LinkedIN)

Lastly, read your email out loud to hear how it sounds.  Test it.  You are reading for feel and for energy.