Questions For William

Today at 4PM, my partner and I are hosting a 90 minute presentation on The Business Blockchain.  The format should be fun.  William Mougayar is going to present for 20 minutes.  Then, it’s Q+A from the audience.  Chicago is where Phil Donohue and Oprah started, so I don’t imagine the crowd will be bashful.

Chicago can be a center for Business to Business Fin tech.  The talent is here.  The network is here.  There is a massive amount of talent that is sitting in the rooms of high frequency trading firms.  The top engineers in the world.

Here’s what I would like to ask anyone who reads this blog.  What question would you ask William if you were in the room and wanted the answer to?  I am posting it a bit early so people in Europe and points beyond can weigh in.  Don’t be shy.  There are no stupid questions.  William can answer it in the comments or, better yet we will work it into the program and it will make it to the video.

What’s the burning question you’d like answered about Bitcoin/Blockchain as it relates to business?

  • Brady

    It makes sense to me that blockchain technology is going to “disrupt” global commerce. I’m interested in seeing how this will play out. Do you think it will be more of a gradual adoption, a catalytic event that spurs rapid change, or some combination of both? -Brady

  • Rishi

    What is you take on Editable Blockchain. Do you think there is a need for one. Once we make it editable, it is no longer consensus based. How different do you see it than a database in that case.?

  • Peter Thiel’s remarks about the super smart’s two choices – SV (Silicon Valley) and New York, some agree with: http://www.chicagobusiness.com/article/20160919/OPINION/160919839/sorry-chicago-but-peter-thiel-is-mostly-right

    What areas are most likely to have the highest top talent want to be in Chicago?
    or
    Even if this is true for Tech & Finance, does it really matter so much?

    • B2B Fin Tech has an extraordinary amount of talent in Chicago. Look at the trading firms based here, and which engineering schools they hire from. Top ones in the world. Top people are here programming, doing Artificial Intelligence and other cutting edge disciplines inside trading firms. There will come a time when some of them want to spin out-and do their own thing. How do they do it-what’s the support network like for them-and how do they raise money to execute? Key questions that must be answered.

  • Andrew Page

    Many of the biggest concerns business stakeholders have about blockchain applications today center around arbitration and edge case behavior of applications. “What if an end-user loses his/her private key?” “What happens if the application behaves in ways the user doesn’t expect?”

    In the DAO hack, the group that performed arbitration around unexpected behavior was the mining community. The community resolved the issue and moved forward, but one could imagine it would be tougher to have miners cast informed votes for one dispute in a future where there are 10 or 100 DAO-sized applications running on the underlying blockchain simultaneously.

    We use the judiciary in modern society to interpret and apply the law. America’s court system acts as the final judge in all cases involving laws of Congress, and the highest law of all — the Constitution. One could think of the judiciary as an arbitration layer sitting between society’s protocol and it’s applications.

    Next-generation blockchain applications could integrate with an on-chain application that could act as a judiciary and should settle disputes without requiring involvement at the blockchain protocol level. The caveat being, this would be voluntary: arbitration-as-a-service for select applications that want to offer additional assurance to end-users around mitigating risks associated with using the application.

    Could you shed some light on whether you think an on-chain arbitration layer could emerge in the future, sitting between the protocol layer and user-facing smart contracts (the application layer)? Do you think a more robust dispute-resolution mechanism is a pre-condition for the first widely adopted blockchain applications?

  • Andrew Page

    Many of the biggest concerns business stakeholders have about blockchain applications center around arbitration and edge case behavior. “What if an end-user loses his/her private key?” “What happens if the application behaves in ways the user doesn’t expect?”

    In the DAO hack, the group that performed arbitration around unexpected behavior was the mining community. The community resolved the issue and moved forward, but one could imagine it would be tougher to have miners cast informed votes for one dispute in a future where there are 10 or 100 DAO-sized applications running on the underlying blockchain simultaneously.

    We use the judiciary in modern society to interpret and apply the law. America’s court system acts as the final judge in all cases involving laws of Congress, and the highest law of all — the Constitution. One could think of the judiciary as an arbitration layer sitting between society’s protocol and its applications.

    Next-generation blockchain applications could integrate with an on-chain application that could act as a judiciary and settle disputes without requiring involvement at the blockchain protocol level. The caveat being, this would be voluntary: arbitration-as-a-service for select applications that want to offer additional assurance to end-users around mitigating risks associated with using the application. The arbitration applications could be implemented a variety of ways.

    Do you think an on-chain arbitration contracts could become common in the future? Do you think a more robust dispute-resolution mechanism is a pre-condition for the internet-of-value, where my property titles, investments, and personal identity are on a blockchain?

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